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About MS

09 November 2018
Spasticity

Spasticity and spasms are a common symptom of MS and can have a big impact on your daily life. To find out how they can be successfully treated and managed, we put some of your questions to physiotherapist, Katrina Buchanan.

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02 November 2018
medicinal cannabis

From 1 November, medicinal cannabis can be prescribed by specialist doctors. We look at what is meant by medicinal cannabis, how legislation is changing and what this means for people with MS.

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23 October 2018
woman smiling at camera holding on to her hat

What causes MS? This is something we yet don't know, but there are a lot of theories out there. In this blog guest blogger Emily, takes us through some of them. 

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08 October 2018
2 pairs of feet sticking out of a cover

A lot of people with MS will experience sexual problems at some point in their lives, but yet we often find it hard to speak up about sex and MS. We think this needs to change. 

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21 May 2018
Holidays

The weather's picked up, the BBQs are out and the ice-cream van is making its tuneful way up our road. This can only mean one thing: the holidays are hurtling towards us. As a general rule, breaks away are meant to be a relaxing experience. But when MS comes as part of the package deal, this isn't always the case. Caroline, who blogs at Mildly Scrambled, was diagnosed 14 years ago and has picked up a few holidaying tips along the way.

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04 May 2018
Toilet sign on brick wall

Bowel and bladder symptoms in MS are common and often easily managed, so it’s important to be open about what you’re going through so you can get the support you need. We put some of your questions about these issues to MS specialist nurse Noreen Barker. 

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02 May 2018
Holding hands

Whether it’s the everyday tasks that keep you independent, like getting dressed in the morning and cleaning your teeth, or being able to do those things you enjoy, like baking or painting, the dexterity and coordination of your hands and arms is essential. This was acknowledged by the MS team at Barts in 2016 when they launched their #ThinkHand campaign and began raising awareness on the importance of upper limb function in the MS community. The awareness campaign has been steadily gaining momentum, so we decided to catch up with Professor Gavin Giovannoni to find out more about the campaign and learn why we should all be ‘thinking hand’

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06 February 2018
Amy was diagnosed with MS at 14

Increasing numbers of young people are being affected by MS - either because they have the disease themselves, or because a family member has been diagnosed. There isn’t enough reliable, accessible information to help them understand their condition. We’re determined to change this. But we need your help. 

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31 October 2017
Dr Nancy Chiaravalloti

Anyone can have problems with forgetting things, but if you have MS this could be a significant problem. Dr Nancy Chiaravalloti has led research into ways people with MS can boost their memory.

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24 October 2017
Person laying in bed dreaming of a dripping tap

If you wake several times during the night needing to get up for a wee, having a full night's sleep is really difficult. In this blog we explain what nocturia is and what you can do to to help with it.

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12 October 2017
Verity

Last year Verity Duff from North Northamptonshire came on our foundation course for new MS nurses. We caught up with her to find out about her first year as an MS nurse, and the difference our support has made to her work 

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22 March 2017
Parenting and MS

First comes the crying and the sleepless nights, then there’s the troublesome toddler years, and then, before you know it, your house is shaking from the door-slamming of a surly teen. Parenthood, whatever stage you’re at, is never easy, and definitely never dull. But when you’re attempting to raise a child while coping with the unpredictability of MS, it throws up a whole new set of challenges. Here are five top tips for juggling parenthood and MS. 

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11 August 2016
Wooden doll lying back with exhaustion

Many MS symptoms seem invisible to other people. This blog explores some of the reasons for this and suggests what you could do to raise awareness.

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30 June 2016
Blue sky with clouds

Jane from the Information Team blogs about why many people with MS find that their symptoms get worse when they are hot. 

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07 October 2015
A new focus on brain health: Amy Bowen reports from ECTRIMS 2015

Amy Bowen, our Director of Service Development, reports from ECTRIMS 2015 on what is widely expected to be the most significant MS conference for many years

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30 September 2015
Getting early treatment in perspective graphic

Today, the MS Society publishes a consensus report on early treatment for people with relapsing remitting MS. Amy Bowen, MS Trust Director of Service Development, explains what this means for people with MS and what we're doing about it.

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29 July 2015
MS hug

The MS hug sounds quite nice – if you haven’t experienced it! Jane from the MS Trust information team explains what it is and how you can deal with it

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24 June 2015

Eve Darwood is a philosophy teacher at a secondary school in Lincolnshire. Last year she was diagnosed with MS. In this blog post she explains how her job, helping young people make sense of the world, has affected how she makes sense of MS (and vice versa).

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17 June 2015

Earlier this week our Director of Service Development, Amy Bowen, was asked by a national paper to comment on the issue of medicinal cannabis in MS, and in particular Sativex, a drug used to treat muscle spasticity. When published, Amy’s interview was edited down to a couple of lines in a larger article. Here she explores some of the difficult issues around cannabis use in MS in more depth

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04 June 2015

Liz Thompson is one of the MS Trust's most passionate supporters (and a cake baker!). One of the ways she supports the work of the MS Trust is by volunteering every year at her local Cards For Good Causes shop. We asked her what motivates her to volunteer, and what she gets out of working in the shop.

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27 May 2015

The media has highlighted the results of a survey published today by the MS Society about being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The survey raises issues about the challenges of being diagnosed with MS and the delays and mis-diagnoses that some people experience. It reflects many of the themes that came out in the MS Trust’s recent research into the experience of being diagnosed with MS.

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22 May 2015
Group of ladies waiting to go on the plane

MS Trust Fundraising Officer Jess Wright tells us about the Big Blue Jump which took place during MS Awareness Week and her own impromptu parachute jump.

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11 May 2015

Finding that the pattern of your MS is changing from relapsing remitting to secondary progressive can be a distressing experience. Many people report that it feels like being diagnosed with MS all over again. How can we improve the support available to people going through transition? Two years ago we commissioned a team of researchers at Cardiff University to explore people’s experiences and look at ways support could be improved. Dr Freya Davies explains what they found out.

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11 May 2015

Dr Jeremy Chataway is a consultant neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and has been involved in MS research for many years, most recently into the effects of simvastatin on progressive MS. He’s now leading on the MS-SMART trial, looking at the effects of three drugs which are already used for other conditions on people with secondary progressive MS. The trial is recruiting throughout 2015.

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11 May 2015

There have recently been encouraging developments in understanding and treating progressive MS. In this issue of Open Door we report on MS Trust research into the experience of transition between relapsing and secondary progressive MS and hear from Dr Jeremy Chataway on his research into the effects of three drugs on people with secondary progressive MS. To introduce the feature, Professor Alan Thompson, who is co-chair of team that coordinates the International Progressive MS Alliance’s research programme, explains how the focus has changed.

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11 May 2015

The issue of vaccinations and multiple sclerosis raises a number of questions for people with MS. Are the treatments safe? Do they work in MS? Are they affected by other treatments? Here we look at some of the more frequently asked questions.

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01 May 2015

The 67th annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology took place in Washington, April 18-25. Pre-meeting media announcements created high expectations for several presentations at the meeting, particularly treatments which may promote remyelination and neuroprotection and potentially slow the build-up of disability.

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23 February 2015

We’ve all heard stories about miracle cures for MS; these days they often involve stem cells. Neil Scolding is the Burden Professor and Director of the Bristol Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, and he has a special interest in MS and cell therapy.

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03 December 2014

We know that the government’s changes to work-related benefits are hitting people with MS hard. As you may know, as a small charity the MS Trust restricts the government policy work we do specifically to health issues. We believe that everyone with MS is entitled to a full life, even if we don’t have the capacity to work in all areas. 

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26 November 2014

New care standards have been unveiled by the Welsh Government, to improve standards of care throughout the NHS. They’ve gained more urgency after care scandals were reported at the Princess of Wales hospital in Bridgend and Glan Clywd hospital in Rhyl. The new, improved standards of care are collated into a Health Standards Framework, which is based around 7 quality themes.

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11 November 2014
Head graphic full of thoughts

About half of all people with MS have problems at some time with aspects of memory, attention span or concentration. Dawn Langdon, Professor of Neuropsychology at Royal Holloway, University of London, looks at promising research into MS and memory.

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10 November 2014
Atlantic Lions standing on bridge

Why do we want to cross an entire ocean in a small rowing boat? Three reasons really. First, the sense of adventure that only the high seas can bring. Second, the challenge in pushing the human body to the endurance limits. But third, and most important, to make a real difference to a charity so close to our hearts.

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28 October 2014

Making Sense of MS was only possible thanks to people living with MS. You filled in surveys, took part in focus groups and interviews, responded to blogs, reviewed the work in progress and raised the funds that have made the whole thing possible. You even helped us come up with a name for the whole thing!

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21 October 2014

Yesterday we reported on our survey which found that only 12 per cent of people with MS felt they got all the information they needed when they were diagnosed. The impact of this information gap can be profound. Many people who took part in our survey told us that they felt they had to do their own research on the internet. What they found was often overwhelming, sometimes misleading and certainly not tailored for them.

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11 August 2014

Graham and Nicki Law got married in 1997. Since then they’ve discovered that they are one of only a handful of couples in the UK where both partners have MS. Here they share their story and explain how they’ve found that mindfulness can help them deal with their symptoms and support each other.

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28 May 2014

Today is World MS Day, the only global awareness raising campaign for MS. Every year, people with MS and MS organisations around the world come together to share information about MS and to raise awareness on how it affects the lives of more than two million people around the world.

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16 May 2014

MS rehab services vary depending on where you live. If you have an MS nurse, they are often the best people to ask what’s available locally. If you have an MS therapy centre near you they might also be able to help you find a physiotherapist or other rehab professionals. You might need a referral from your GP to access some of these services.

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16 May 2014

Rod McLaren is a writer and artist who was diagnosed with MS last year. Ahead of this year’s MS Trust Secret Art Show, Rod considers the challenges of depicting an ‘invisible disease’.

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16 May 2014
Bladder problems are a common symptom of MS

Around 75 per cent of people with MS experience bladder problems and these can have a big impact on your everyday life. However it is often possible to treat these and simple management strategies can make a real difference.

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16 May 2014

As this edition of Open Door hits your doormat the preliminary results of the Department of Health Risk-sharing Scheme (RSS) will have been presented at the Association of British Neurologists meeting, and by the next edition we hope the full results will have been published in the Lancet or BMJ.

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08 May 2014

Gemma Berryman was diagnosed with MS when she was just 16 years old. Six years on, she has decided not to let her condition stop her following her dreams and she hopes to inspire other young people with MS by sharing her story here.

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20 February 2014

Jill Lovell has lived with MS for over 30 years and has been involved in the work of the MS Trust since the early days. Here she looks back on some of the big changes of the last 21 years.

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26 September 2013

Here at the MS Trust we’re currently working on information designed to help people with MS manage their day-to-day symptoms. The first booklets in the series will look at common bladder or bowel problems and suggest practical ways you can work together with your health professionals to deal with them simply and effectively.

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21 August 2013

With a glittering career as a chef, restaurant owner and lecturer, Jonathan Reen was in the prime of his life. Then, at the age of 46, he was diagnosed with primary progressive MS. For six months, as his symptoms got worse, he had to give up the work he loved. But now, after a period of readjustment, he’s set up Urban Chefs, a new business offering cooking lessons to people in their own homes. Here he explains how his lifelong passion for food has kept him going through the ups and downs.

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17 May 2013

Diane Evans on the inappropriate and unthinking ways that some people talk to a person with multiple sclerosis and why it’s best to stop, look and listen before holding forth on MS

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05 March 2013
Describe fatigue to others

What is it like to have fatigue (it is really awful) and how can we explain fatigue to others who have never experienced it? (almost impossible)

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04 February 2013

Many people are intensely interested in what is happening in MS research. On Saturday, I was lucky enough to go to a Research Day held by Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, with UCL Partners, to hear what research they are doing and what it might mean for people with MS. This research group includes some of the top researchers in MS in the UK and they are keen to get people involved. The audience were mostly people with MS, their friends and family.

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23 January 2013
Snow and trees

Read our guest Blog from Steve Woodward about how to stay safe and tackle the snowy weather.

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19 July 2012

The thing we were always keen to achieve with Gallop is that it should be different to the video material already out there for MSers.  If shift.ms were to make a film then it we wanted to bring something different to the table that would resonate with our community and raise awareness of the challenges of the early days/years of living with MS.

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06 July 2012

Are you healthy? Pretty much? Imagine you’re standing, there, wherever you are just now – living room, office, street – and someone runs over and gives you a shove. Of course, you’re shocked. Sure, your arm might hurt a bit where they pushed you. But basically, you’re OK. Your feet are firmly planted on solid ground.
But it’s different for me and other like me: people with dreadful, crippling fatigue caused by a long term illness such as MS, CFS/ME, lupus, cancer etc.

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13 February 2012

In my day to day work I spend a lot of time of Facebook and Twitter, I post news articles and pick up on questions people might have for the MS Trust. I notice a lot of people (including myself) get very confused about drugs that are in development for MS. You see a news item about something like Sativex getting a licence, which will excite a lot of people thinking this entitles them to be able to have the treatment, but when they try to get it, they get turned down as the drug is not yet approved by the NHS. 

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01 May 2007
person giving someone flowers

A diagnosis of MS may affect how you start a new relationship or how you feel about yourself and your relationship with a long-term partner. 

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