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MS in the media - 11 November 2016

Published on

5 - 11 November 2016

These are links to news stories from the last week that may be of interest to people in the UK. The link beneath each item will take you to the original story.

Please note that the MS Trust did not write the original items and does not endorse their content nor any claims made in them.

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Use of dietary approaches to manage MS

Researchers found the evidence from previous studies on the effect of diet on MS to be poor and insufficient for drawing firm conclusions.  A survey of into expectations of dietary approaches found that almost two thirds thought a diet could help their MS, with most hoping it would slow down progression.  Three quarters took a supplement of some sort

Source: MD Magazine

MS Trust link: Diet

Brain tissue ratios and prognosis

MS affects both grey matter and white matter in brains.  Research has found that people with a higher ratio of grey to white matter were less likely to reach a level where disability starts become significant (EDSS 4) and for their MS to progress over ten years

Source: Neurology Advisor

MS Trust link: MS research updates

Exercise is valuable for people with more advanced MS

Two small studies, one in people with progressive MS the other in people with limited mobility, looked at the value of exercise.  Although trickier to carry out, exercise was found to be beneficial for fatigue and improved quality of life

Source: National MS Society (USA)

MS Trust link: Exercises for people with MS

Development of progressive MS research

Interview with Prof Alan Thompson, neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery in London, about how research into progressive MS has developed in recent years.  Prof Thompson plays an important role in the Progressive MS Alliance

Source: MD Magazine

MS Trust link: The new focus on progressive MS