Created date

Published on

You are here:

MS in the media - 8 September 2017

2-8 September 2017

These are links to news stories from the last week that may be of interest to people in the UK. The link beneath each item will take you to the original story.

Please note that the MS Trust did not write the original items and does not endorse their content nor any claims made in them.

To keep up to date on all the latest news, views and research on multiple sclerosis, sign up for Open Door, our free newsletter or regular email alerts

Research into alternative therapies is poor

A review of research into complementary and alternative therapies for MS that found that most of the published research isn't very good and make it difficult to make conclusions about effectiveness

Source: MSIF

MS Trust link: Complementary and alternative medicine

 

Cladribine (Mavenclad) use over four years

An extension study followed people who had taken cladribine for two years as part of the CLARITY trial for a further two years. One group continues to take cladribine, the other was moved onto a placebo. Whilst demonstrating the sustainable effects of the treatment, the results suggest that people don't need to take the drug after the initial two year period.

Source: Merck press release

MS Trust link: Cladribine (Mavenclad)

Gilenya in children

Initial results from a phase III study that found Gilenya (fingolimod) was better than Avonex (beta interferon 1a) at reducing relapses in people with MS aged between 10 and 17. Full results will be presented at the joint ECTRIMS-ACTRIMS meeting in October

Source: Pharma Times
Source: Medpage Today

MS Trust link: Childhood MS

Perceptions of MS in older people

A Canadian study of people with an average age of 65 found that perceptions of fatigue, disability or social support were similar between men and women with MS.  Men had a worse opinion of their overall health, were less resilient and participated less in life roles. Men were also more likely to be depressed. Women were more likely to be anxious.

Source: MS News Today

MS Trust link: MS research updates