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Other names: Lyrica

Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant drug used in the treatment of neuropathic or nerve pain associated with a number of conditions including multiple sclerosis.

How pregabalin works

It is believed that pregabalin works by calming over stimulated nerve cells, which may be an underlying cause for various types of pain.

How is pregabalin given?

Pregabalin is taken orally as tablets.

Side effects and contraindications

Pregabalin is generally well tolerated with side effects most commonly reported in trials being drowsiness, dizziness, weight gain and fatigue. The extent of the side effects seems to be related to the size of the dose taken. The degree of dizziness and sleepiness can also be increased if pregabalin is taken with certain medications, such as those containing oxycodone (for pain), lorazepam (for anxiety) or alcohol.

Pregabalin should not be taken during pregnancy or when breastfeeding, unless you are told otherwise by your doctor.

Stopping treatment with pregabalin should be handled gradually to avoid withdrawal symptoms.

 

References

  • Gray P. Pregabalin in the management of central neuropathic pain. Expert Opinion in Pharmacotherapy 2007;8(17):3035-3041. Summary

Last updated: 24 September 2013
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